Latin America and Europe: The Challenges of Globalization, the SMEs as Drivers of Growth

DEVELOPMENT - Nov 13, 2012

The 2012 edition (Barcelona, 19-20 October) of the Seminar known by its Spanish acronym ADI (Agenda de Desarrollo Iberoamericana) focused, as always, on the debate and analysis of the economic and social perspectives in Latin American countries, but with an added twist: a reflection on what can Latin America and Europe do together, economically and politically, under the current circumstances to the benefit of both.

Description

The 2012 edition (Barcelona, 19-20 October) of the Seminar known by its Spanish acronym ADI (Agenda de Desarrollo Iberoamericana) focused, as always, on the debate and analysis of the economic and social perspectives in Latin American countries, but with an added twist: a reflection on what can Latin America and Europe do together, economically and politically, under the current circumstances to the benefit of both.

At a time when Latin American countries have managed to reduce their deficits and enjoy economic growth, they seem better equipped than many in Europe to weather the crisis. True, stern macroeconomic and monetary policies have resulted in severe inequalities that blow up social cohesion and weigh down on development. But it is nevertheless a favorable time for action, since Latin American countries, as Enrique V. Iglesias, Iberoamerican Secretary-General, said, are beginning to have the capacity to manage their own affairs.

The Seminar, whose purpose is to make policy recommendations to the Iberoamerican Summits of Heads of State and Government (the next is due to be held in Cadiz on 16-17 November 2012), centered on the debate over the cost/benefit analyses of introducing a global financial transactions tax –primarily for stabilization purposes, but also as a collection mechanism--, and on the Latin American SMEs, which have become a driving force for both innovation and employment in the region, which therefore benefit from public support in some countries (Brazil), and which are increasingly participating in international SME networks.

It was said at the Seminar that the present decade could well be Latin America’s –or to the contrary, depending on what Latin American countries do or do not do. The slow reaction of Europe to the crisis is having an effect on Latin America too, and they should avoid complacency over its recent successes. Latin America should also avoid a development model based on raw materials, poor education and an underdeveloped internal market. And they should commit themselves to innovation. Here again, the path of doing things together (with Europe, with Spain) appears as a logical, even natural option. But it means thinking them together too. It means debating the big topics together --for instance: will the Heads of State and Government at the Iberoamerican Summit in Cadiz talk about the European crisis or not?

The ADI Seminar is a project initiated by CIDOB in 2005, with the collaboration of the Iberoamerican General Secretariat and the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (CEPAL). Starting this year, ESADE Business School joins the organization.


Sponsored by:

ADI 2012 patrocini


Organized by:

ADI 2012 organizan


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