Pourquoi l'Etat islamique” attire-t-il?

Pourquoi l'Etat islamique” attire-t-il?

Moussa Bourekba, Chercheur et Project Manager, CIDOB

20 000. C'est le nombre de jihadistes étrangers recensés à fin janvier 2015 qui auraient rejoint l’Irak et la Syrie pour enfler les rangs de l’organisation Etat islamique (dorénavant, OEI) et d’autres groupes. La montée en force spectaculaire de l’OEI dans cette région et ses répercussions mondiales (coalition internationale, actes terroristes au nom de l’OEI, etc.) obligent aujourd’hui nombre de pays européens à lutter contre un phénomène d’envergure mondiale: le départ croissant de jeunes et moins jeunes qui quittent le pays où ils ont toujours vécu pour gagner des contrées où l'extrême violence coexiste avec une utopie politico-religieuse.

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 Juncker’s EU army:  a tool of politics more than defence

Jean-Claude Juncker has revived the debate on a European army, an old, periodically torpedoed aspiration. In the 1950s, when the European integration process was in its embryonic phase, six nations led the European Defence Community.

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Five responses to the terrorist threat in the Maghreb

Five Responses to the Terrorist Threat in the Maghreb

Eduard Soler i Lecha, Research Coordinator, CIDOB

It is no accident that Tunisia has been hit by terrorism, nor that the attackers directly targeted tourism and the parliament. This was an attack on democracy and on Tunisia's opening up to the outside world and it is easy to surmise that the terrorists will measure their success not only by the number of victims but by the damaging impact it may have on both the Tunisian transition and the country's fragile economy.

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The Hidden Potential of Agroforestry Systems in the Chapare Coca Production Area, Bolivia

The Hidden Potential of Agroforestry Systems in the Chapare Coca Production Area, Bolivia

Eduardo Lopez Rosse, Independent Professor at the Valle del Sacta Experimental Unit-UMSS

Tropical regions are the main sources of the fruit, meat and non-forestry timber products that contribute to the state’s food security and sovereignty, enhance producers’ livelihoods and satisfy consumer demand.

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La coopération Sud-Sud au profit de la sécurité alimentaire: Cas de la filière des céréales dans les pays du Maghreb

La question alimentaire dans le Maghreb est devenue un problème crucial, sous l’effet de plusieurs facteurs socioéconomiques, démographiques et environnementaux. Ces facteurs affectent négativement le potentiel productif agricole régional qui reste en dessous des besoins alimentaires.

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Tunisia: The EU Must Put its Money Where its Mouth Is

Tunisia: The EU Must Put its Money Where its Mouth Is

Francis Ghilès, Associate Senior Researcher, CIDOB

The NATO-backed intervention in Libya in 2011 was “a huge mistake on the part of the international community and the Libyans” one of alliance’s most senior officials told a delegation of senior Algerians in Brussels last month.

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Opposition to fracking fuels a wider debate

Opposition to Fracking Fuels a Wider Debate

Francis Ghilès, Associate Senior Researcher, CIDOB

President Abdelaziz Bouteflika insists that “all energy sources, whether conventional or not, are a gift from God and it is our duty to use them for the development of the country, while strictly respecting the environment”.

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Comunicar Europa: ¿es realmente tan complicado?

Communicating Europe: Is it Really that Complicated?

Yolanda Onghena, Senior Research Fellow and Isabel Verdet, Research Assistant, CIDOB

Talking about how Europe is communicated seems to inevitably lead to that ungraspable something that is usually called “European identity”. However, when trying to overcome this seemingly insurmountable barrier and go out the “identity loop”, the obstacles Europe –and, more specifically, the EU– faces in terms of communication appear to have a triple dimension: how Europe is communicated from the European institutions themselves, how the message is perceived by citizens, and the role of media, as it name implies, as mediators between the institutions and citizenship.

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 "Operation Nemtsov": Disinformation, Confusion  and Some Worrying Hypotheses

"Operation Nemtsov": Disinformation, Confusion and some Worrying Hypotheses

Nicolás de Pedro, Research Fellow, CIDOB and Marta Ter, Head of the North Caucasus department at the Lliga dels Drets dels Pobles

The investigation into the assassination of Boris Nemtsov reminds previous ones on high-profile political killings, although the uncertainties grow with every new revelation. The verified, documented connection between the main suspect, Zaur Dadayev, and Ramzan Kadyrov, Chechen strongman and close ally of Putin strengthens the theory linking the crime to the Kremlin and suggests possible internal fighting within the state security apparatus.

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 Libya: intervention, indifference and interference

Libya: intervention, indifference and interference

Eduard Soler i Lecha, Research Coordinator, CIDOB

The videos made by Islamic State have the undoubted potential to affect international policy. Designed to fan the flames of the conflict, they have been achieving this in Syria and Iraq for months and it is now Libya's turn. Neither the choice of the victims nor the location is accidental.

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European Central Bank decision-making – Reform, Old Commitments and New Realities

New decision-making rules apply to the European Central Bank (ECB) from 1 January 2015, the day Lithuania adopted the euro and the euro area club enlarged to nineteen. According to the new rules Governors will take turns to vote in the ECB’s decision-making body, the Governing Council. This rotation takes place with asymmetric frequency, depending on the size of euro area economies measured by their GDP and banking sector. All euro area central bank Governors will continue to participate in Governing Council meetings and discussions.

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Economics will be the Test of Tunisian Exceptionalism

Economics Will Be the Test of Tunisian Exceptionalism

Francis Ghilès, Senior Research Fellow, CIDOB

The revolts which started four years ago ushered in a period of change in the Arab world which has been more violent and chaotic that most observers foresaw. Syria is self-destructing. Libya is disintegrating. Egypt has reverted to military rule. The emergence of the Islamic State has further destabilised the region.

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Spain and the European Union-Russia Conflict: the Impact of the Sanctions

Spain and the European Union-Russia Conflict: the Impact of the Sanctions

Antonio Sánchez Andrés, Lecturer in the Department of Applied Economics, Universidad de Valencia, and Nicolás de Pedro, Research Fellow, CIDOB

Relations between the European Union and Russia are at the lowest point in their history. Some Russian analysts even warn that we are approaching the point of breakdown. Moscow is attempting to impede the tightening of the sanctions and, at the same time, destroy the fragile—although for the moment holding—European unity on the subject.

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Modernising its Army Allows Algeria to Play a More Active Regional Role

Modernising its Army Allows Algeria to Play a More Active Regional Role

Francis Ghilès, Associate Senior Researcher, CIDOB

Following the bombing by the Egyptian air force of terrorist groups in eastern Libya – who claim affiliation with the Islamic State - in retaliation for the execution of Egyptian Coptic workers Italy, France and Egypt have called on the United Nations to mount a military operation against the north African country.

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Fifteen Trends for 2015

Fifteen Trends for 2015

Eduard Soler i Lecha, Research Coordinator, CIDOB*

Without a crystal ball, daring to imagine the future and putting it in writing is playing with fire. Making predictions about the immediate future is even riskier than doing so at two decades' distance. A look at the recent past, at the wave of protests that shook the Arab world from December 2010 to March 2011, for example, reminds us that it is one thing to identify the existence of conditions that are ripe for the breakout of a crisis and quite another to guess when it will happen and what the detonator will be.

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France's deep Identity Crisis

France's Deep Identity Crisis

Francis Ghilès, Associate Senior Researcher, CIDOB

After Napoleon’s final defeat in 1815, France began to search its soul about its loss of dominance in Europe but remained proud of its culture and society. Constrained by the Treaty of Vienna, it decided, in the words of Alexis de Tocqueville to project its “grandeur” in Africa – hence its conquest of Algeria in 1830. Dominance in Europe passed to the United Kingdom after 1815 and Germany after 1870.

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France "is Charlie", but for how long?

France "is Charlie", but for how long?

Moussa Bourekba, Researcher and Project Manager, CIDOB

"We are Charlie". So goes the message of unity we may take from the Place de la République in Paris on Sunday 11th January. As a result of the hunt for and capture of those responsible for the terrorist attacks on January 7th—the siege on Charlie Hebdo—and January 8th in Montrouge, French citizens, political leaders (except the Front National) and around 50 heads of state and government took part in the enormous republican marches organised in Paris and throughout France to commemorate the death of the victims but equally and, above all, to send out a message of national unity in the face of the danger confronting France.

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Greece: its European elections

Greece: its European elections

Eduard Soler i Lecha, Research Coordinator and Héctor Sánchez Margalef, Researcher, CIDOB

The Greeks are worried about the EU and the EU is worried about Greece. The attention the rest of Europe is giving to Greek politics is a clear demonstration that what happens in one EU member state—especially one in the eurozone—has clear repercussions for the rest of Europeans.

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 The Response Ulrich Beck Would Have Liked to Hear

The Response Ulrich Beck Would Have Liked to Hear

Yolanda Onghena, Senior Researcher, CIDOB

The death of Ulrich Beck leaves us bereft of that always lucid, special perspective found in each of his articles or in the new publication that arrived on just the day that, for the umpteenth time, we were doubting our own theories or missing someone to lend a hand and help us understand the world.

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The Army and the Exercise of Power in Burkina Faso

The Army and the Exercise of Power in Burkina Faso: Lessons from the popular uprising on October 30th and 31st, 2014

Boureïma N. Ouedraogo*, Doctor of Sociology, Université de Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

In Burkina Faso an inextricable link exists between the army and the exercise of power. In the context of recent events, the role of the army is an essential element for understanding their causes as well as the issues surrounding the fall of the Blaise Compaoré regime and his subsequent flight from the country on October 31st.

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Elections and Peace in Africa: Perspectives for 2015

Elections and Peace in Africa: Perspectives for 2015

Anna Lührmann, Doctoral Researcher, Humboldt University, Berlin

2015 promises to be a record election year for Africa because 17 African countries have scheduled national elections. In the last decades almost all African countries established some sort of national practice to hold elections.

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China in Africa: New Perspectives  on Development

China in Africa: New Perspectives on Development

Artur Colom-Jaén, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona; SOAS University of London

Times are changing in Africa. After two decades of poor developmental records, since the beginning of this century the prospects for many African countries are improving in terms of growth and development, although the challenges ahead remain huge.

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The EU and international order: accommodation or entrenchment

The convergence of an EU in crisis and a changing world order (power transition) is the subject of analysis in this edition of the Revista CIDOB d’Afers Internacionals

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Pakistan: Overview of Sources of Tension with Regional Implications 2014

Having witnessed a peaceful transfer of power from one elected government to the next in 2013, Pakistan seemed poised for aperiod of political stability in 2014. This has not, however, beenthe case, with the government facing allegations of electoral fraud, anddealing with sustained street demonstrations and calls to resign from atleast one opposition party, in addition to a politico-religious group withpolitical aspirations. Similarly, the negotiation of a loan with the IMF under the Extended Fund Facility in September 2013 has not resulted in significant economic reform, and growth projections remain below potential.

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Afghanistan: Overview of Sources of Tension with Regional Implications 2014

2014 has been a crucial year not only for Afghanistan but also for the region. It seems Afghanistan’s transition is, in a way, a transition for thewhole region, with the regional powers eagerly following the developmentsin Afghanistan and reacting accordingly. This year, the region as awhole geared its efforts more and more towards ensuring stability in thiswar-ravaged country. This is especially true when it comes to Russia and China – in addition to India, obviously.

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Afghanistan: Monitoring the Key Regional Powers. Report 4

Afghanistan: Monitoring the Key Regional Powers. Report 4

Malaiz Daud, Associate Researcher, CIDOB

The purpose of this series of quarterly monitoring reports (2014) is to monitor and track the actions,public statements of five key STAP RP regional actors (India, Iran, Russia, China, Saudi Arabia) onAfghanistan; the development of, and their participation in relevant international and regionaldiscussion meetings, including the Istanbul Process, Heart of Asia, RECCA, SCO; the five key regionalactors’ economic decisions and agreements, including, but not limited to, the energy and infrastructuresectors, which have implications for the identified sources of tension in Afghanistan with regionalimplications (see CIDOB STAP RP Mapping Document at www.cidobafpakproject.com).

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